A Walk on the Wild Side – Playing with Lions & Cheetahs

A Walk on the Wild Side – Playing with Lions & Cheetahs

Lions in Zambia

 

Petting a lion has been on my bucket list since I first visited Africa 10 years ago. The possibility of touching the fur of these fierce, beautiful cats was one I couldn’t pass up – so when we arrived in Zambia I immediately booked a Lion walk with Mukuni Big 5.

 

Lions in Zambia

 

They had a combo package where I could walk with both lions and cheetahs – and no one needed to twist my arm into taking them up on it.

 

mukuni big 5

 

Jordan chose not to come as he wasn’t able to find any regulatory body that ensured that the companies that offer these lion encounters are actually doing what they say they’re doing with the animals (namely, working on conservation and increasing the lion population in the wild). Mukuni says they aim to breed cheetah and lions and release them in to the wild, but as yet they haven’t actually done this. I’ll admit that I’m with Jordan on the ethics, but shamefully my urge to walk with a lion stuffed my morals in the back seat. I definitely checked what the conditions for the animals are, especially since in Thailand I went to pet tigers and instantly regretted it when I saw how the animals were being kept.

 

Lions in Zambia

 

So I was picked up early in the morning from our hostel and taken to the private reserve of Mukuni Big 5. There, after signing a waiver and paying, the group of 8 of us taking part in the Lion Walk were introduced to our guide.

 

mukuni big 5

 

He had us stop and grab a stick and then gave us a briefing on how to behave around the lions. The stick wasn’t for any cruel purpose, it’s simply for them to bite and chew on when they’re feeling playful (instead of your hand).

 

Lions in Zambia

 

After our briefing we were walked further into the reserve – a huge open area, where a male and female lion, siblings, were chilling out. The handlers had drawn a line in the sand and told us not to cross it.

 

Lions in Zambia

 

After one of the handlers showed us how to approach the lions (from behind, talking to them so they know you’re there) and how to pet them (never inside the ears, always firm enough so that it doesn’t tickle), we were each given the opportunity to pet Ada, the male. Laura, the female, is apparently skittish and she wasn’t in the mood to be around people, so she just got up and walked off.

 

Lions in Zambia

She’s not hissing – she was actually just starting to yawn.

 

While we each took our photos and petted Ada, the handlers kept him focused on them by running around in front of him. He was pretty chill, but apparently that’s because he had eaten yesterday (adults only eat once a week).

 

mukuni big 5

 

After a while Ada got up and decided to go for a walk. First he relieved himself, and then he just started walking. The handlers told us to follow him, but never to pass him or to run.

 

lion walk in zambia

 

We took turns walking beside him, just following him where he was going.

 

lion walk in zambia

 

Eventually, after about an hour, the lions went into their enclosure. It was a fenced area with the same bush/wilderness as the open area we had been visiting them in. I wasn’t happy to learn it was an enclosure – since the handler kept saying that they roam free, are free to hunt, etc.

 

lion encounter zambia

 

After we finished we were told to wash our hands, and then we waited for the cheetah handler to come and fetch us for our cheetah encounter.

 

mukuni big 5

 

The cheetahs immediately came to the door of their enclosure as we approached, purring. The handler said it was contentment – but I know that cats purr when they’re content as well as when they’re anxious, so I took that with a pinch of salt.

 

cheetah walk zambia

 

When the cheetahs came out each handler walked them over to us and they instantly laid down. The handler explained how to approach, and what to do in reaction to different things the cheetahs might do. One of them apparently likes to lick people, so he showed us to just close our hand into a fist and let it happen, but to not jerk our hand away. As he did this, the cheetah he was demonstrating with started to lick him. He pet her affectionately and she purred and laid out – it was like watching a domestic cat – an oversized one.

 

cheetah walk zambia

 

We each took turns (now a group of 16, split in to 2 groups of 8 for each cheetah) petting the cheetah. I rubbed her behind her ears and heard her purr. It really was like petting a cat – she raised her chin so I could rub underneath it and then laid herself down. The handlers told me if I wanted I could lay beside her.

 

cheetah walk zambia

cheetah walk zambia

 

I even took a selfie (after asking if it was okay to put my hand in front of her like that – just in case it was an invitation to bite).

 

cheetah encounter

 

At one point she heard a truck from much further than we could see, and she took off running. The handler said that her food always comes by a car so she was looking to see if that was lunch. I did notice that the cheetahs showed a great deal of curiosity – always looking around them – whereas the lions were pretty much interested in chilling out.

 

cheetah walk zambia

 

Eventually the two cheetahs got up and decided to start walking. The handler who had been licked by one before got up to follow them and they nuzzled up to him, rubbing their faces into the palms of his hands. It was clear that he spends the most time with them and that they knew him.

 

cheetah walk zambia

cheetah walk zambia

I think I found the good spot behind her ears.

 

We were all led out of the enclosure we were in with the cheetahs and took turns holding the lead to walk them – though we weren’t really walking them so much as they were walking, with us following. At no point were we allowed to put tension on the lead – so if the cheetah sped up, you sped up with it!

 

cheetah walk zambia

 

Eventually after everyone had had a chance to walk, they were returned to their enclosure – again within one hour.

 

cheetah walk zambia

 

I had thought that was the end of the activity – but after our handler took us back to reception and told us to wash our hands he told me I could also interact with the two lion cubs they had. I was the only one doing this as the other people in my group, from Japan, were on a tight schedule. I was led to the enclosure with 2 cubs, male & female, both 5 months old and siblings.

 

lion cubs zambia

 

As it was just me and the handler, this was far more laid back – I asked before crouching down to take a picture and he told me I could pet them, as long as I came from behind. He warned me that as they were cubs they might want to play, which sounded fantastic to me, so I grabbed a string (which, for a lion, is actually a rope) and treated them the way I would any kitten, dangling it to and fro and having them jump for it. They obliged, taking huge leaps in the air to catch it (where I had to jump out of the way so that they wouldn’t land on me, since the rope was directly in front of me).

 

lion cubs zambia

 

Eventually they were both going for the rope, and I thought it best to let them have it. This started a classic sibling rivalry that ended in rough housing with full biting and scratching.

 

lion cubs zambia

lion cubs zambia

lion cubs zambia

lion cubs zambia

 

When they were a bit more chilled out, I went to pet one (the male) and he showed me his belly – so naturally I rubbed it. The stick came in handy here as he wanted something to play with and as soon as I put it near his muzzle he chomped down and started wrestling with it.

 

lion cubs zambia

 

So we had a mini tug of war – which his sister decided to get in on as well, though on the other side of the stick. So there I was sandwiched between two lion cubs, each biting different ends of the stick.

 

lion cubs zambia

 

After about 40 minutes I was told by the handler it was time to go. The cubs were still playing with each other as we slipped out of the enclosure. Again, I was told to wash my hands, and then I was led to the same car that had picked me up. They dropped me off back at the hostel and I was still playing the last few hours through my mind when I walked in. The experience was amazing.

 

lion cubs zambia

 

In writing this post, however, I did a bit of research that I should have done prior to going on the activity. I guess I wanted to stick my head in the sand and believe that it was more about conservation (since that’s what they claim), and that since the animals were in much better conditions than the tigers I met in Thailand it was all okay. But the reality is a wild animal should never be captive: not in a zoo, and not in a place that presents itself as a conservation effort but allows human contact. The reading I’ve done points out a huge fallacy in that – why would a lion need to interact with a human for conservation? There is no benefit to the animal whatsoever, and if anything it would rather be left alone. You can’t release an animal that’s had human contact back in to the wild, at any rate. Add to that the fact that cubs are separated from their mother (when in a pride they would stay with her for years) and it just seemed to get worse and worse. Yes – the living conditions were much better than what I saw in Thaliand (where the tigers were in concrete cages and when they were let out they were chained to the ground and doped out of their minds) but that’s about where the benefits stop. There’s also a lack of transparency about what happens to the lions after they’re done being ‘useful’ for lion walks and encounters. Mukuni  Big 5 says they intend to release them to game reserves, but they have yet to do this, and they definitely didn’t specify whether or not these “game reserves” are hunting reserves. If they are, then they’ve condemned the animal who’s had a miserable life of walking 3 times a day with eager tourists wanting to pet them to certain death at the hands of a hunter. It makes this experience bittersweet. It was incredible, absolutely, but I shouldn’t have done it and should have respected the animal enough to appreciate it only the way it’s meant to be appreciated – by occasional glimpses in the wild.

Victoria Falls – Zambia

Victoria Falls – Zambia

Known as the “adventure capital” of Africa, Victoria Falls (and its national park) is often considered one of the natural wonders of the world. Since I’d seen Iguaçu Falls a couple of times, I had never really cared about visiting Vic Falls (which I had read wasn’t as impressive), but as more and more people mentioned how amazing it was, and since it happens to be a hub for different Africa itineraries, and since we could get cheaper flights to Livingstone (Zambia) than Victoria Falls Town (Zimbabwe) we figured we’d stop by. The falls are shared by Zambia and Zimbabwe, with the latter taking 75% of the area of the falls. Because of this, people often skip visiting the Zambian side of the falls, opting for the ‘bigger bang’ in Zimbabwe. We were going to do the exact same thing – until I read about the Devil’s Pool, which can only be accessed from Zambia’s side.

Victoria Falls Zambia

The Devil’s Pool is a natural pool that happens to be right on the edge of the top of a waterfall. Consequently, it’s quite a rush to swim in it because you’re literally on the edge of a cliff. It’s on Livingstone Island, a private area within Victoria Falls owned by a resort, so you can only go to the Devil’s Pool with their private tour company – which they charge $65USD per person for the privilege (on top of the $20USD park entry fee).

Victoria Falls Zambia

Not wanting to spend $180USD between us just to go swimming in a natural pool, we started looking into how to get there without a tour. We found very little information online and only a couple sites mentioning that you didn’t have to go to Livingstone Island to get to the Devil’s Pool, and that you could hire a guide within the park who would take you for much, much less. SOLD.

 

How to NOT visit the Devil’s Pool in Victoria Falls

When we got to the park, however, we learned that you absolutely could not reach the Devil’s Pool without entering Livingstone Island, and that you absolutely could not step foot on Livingstone Island without paying for that ridiculous tour. Apparently the guides we had read about were ‘illegal’ guides, and so it wasn’t safe to go with them, not to mention that they wouldn’t be able to take us to the Devil’s Pool anyway, and would likely try and cheat us and take us somewhere totally different. Taking that with a pinch of salt, we skipped the paid tour and wandered into the park.

Devil's Pool Victoria Falls

Our cab driver had spoken to one of the curio shop vendors after we told him what we were trying to do. And that guy waited until we entered the park and walked us over to another guy who didn’t have any shoes on named Felix, who said he could take us as far as Livingstone Island, but unfortunately we wouldn’t be able to cross in as it was private property. He explained that some people go later in the afternoon (around 5P.M., which is an hour before sunset) and the rangers who guard the border of Livingstone island will often let them in for $50 per person (a $15 discount per person), but that still seemed super expensive to us. $100 for a swim? No thanks.

Victoria Falls Zambia

 

Felix was up front about the fact that we couldn’t go to the Devil’s Pool, but said he could take us to another similar natural occurring pool (he called it a Jacuzzi) on the edge of the falls. He wanted $35 per person, and after some very weak bargaining on our part, we agreed on $40 total (really we should have paid $10-$20).

 

Victoria Falls Zambia

We set off with Felix, a native of the area, who hopped from rock to rock with ease. He told us that he often fished in the rivers so he knew the area very well. Jordan and I wondered if we were going to get robbed and left in the middle of nowhere.

Victoria Falls Zambia

 

After stopping in several spots and learning a bit more about the area, he started leading us to this Jacuzzi he had mentioned – the main reason we were there. We had to take our shoes off and wade in the river, which was filled with plankton and was extremely slippery – Jordan and I looked at each other and we knew that we were both thinking the same thing – we’re going to die.
Melodramatic? Maybe – but since we had read about someone dying at Victoria Falls on a trip with an illegal guide, it wasn’t a totally inappropriate thought. That, and when Felix let go of my hand to help Jordan, I slipped on the rock and almost face planted into the river.

Victoria Falls Zambia

Eventually we got to this pool of stagnant water on the edge of the cliff. Luckily, we passed right by it (Jordan and I both were worried that this great ‘Jacuzzi’ he kept telling us about was going to be an utter disappointment and that we had just wasted $80).

Victoria Falls Zambia

Felix led us right to the edge of the cliff and pointed down to a little nook that wasn’t immediately obvious. True to his word, there was a little whirl pool with rushing water and a mini waterfall, leading off to the big fall that went right off the cliff. It really did look like a Jacuzzi, with the rocks almost forming (albeit very slippery) seats, perfect for us to perch on and look over the falls. We grinned and climbed right in (carefully).

Victoria Falls Zambia
We took a selfie, blown away by the sheer awesomeness of this private little pool on the edge of a waterfall. It doesn’t look that impressive, does it?

Victoria Falls Zambia

But then you zoom out and you can see the waterfall pouring from our little pool over the side of the cliff. So what? Big deal.

Devil's Pool Victoria Falls

And then you zoom out entirely and you can see the magnificence of exactly where we were hanging out. HOLY CRAP WE’RE ON THE EDGE OF A FREAKING WATERFALL!!

Victoria Falls Zambia

We had the place all to ourselves, our own private devil’s pool. Felix was awesome – he clambered over the rocks to a viewpoint and hung out under the shade of a tree taking tons of pictures for us, while we splashed and paddled and laughed and grinned. He didn’t rush us, so we just hung out there enjoying it and soaking it all in until we felt we were good to go.

Victoria Falls Zambia

He walked us back to the main trail, where we parted ways. Jordan and I thanked him for sharing this secret place with us that only locals seemed to know about. We felt like we hit the jackpot. We never made it to the Devil’s Pool but we still felt like where we got to go was way cooler than it could ever have been.

Victoria Falls Zambia

We then headed down to the “Boiling Pot”, which is the area where the waters swirl due to the resistance of the rock causing a backflow, exactly the same as you see with boiling water in a hot pot.

 

Victoria Falls Zambia

After a brief stop to check out the swirling waters, we headed back up and left the park, still giddy from the epic waterfall swim we had just done.

 

Victoria Falls Zambia

Tracking Gorillas in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, Uganda

Tracking Gorillas in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, Uganda

When I asked Jordan what, if anything, he wanted to see in Africa, his only reply was “Gorillas”. I hadn’t even thought about gorillas at all, but I had my own little wish list of places I wanted us to go. So since he had only one, I wanted to make sure we ticked it off the list, and made it a priority.

Continue reading “Tracking Gorillas in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, Uganda” »